Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Name that food

Here's a photo quiz: what food do these pictures show?





Hint 1: Almost the entire U.S. crop is grown in California.

Hint 2: They are currently caught up in controversy at the USDA.


If no one puts the right answer in the comments, I'll have a long post about the mystery food in a few days (OK, maybe a few weeks...).



Random link from the archive: Japanese Noodle Soup

Technorati tags: Farms : Food

7 comments:

Kung Foodie Kat said...

green almonds! I use to eat them off the tree at my grams house when I was a kid...damn I miss those days.

Derrick said...

The real question is: How do you pronounce them? All-monds? Or Eh-monds? An acquaintance of mine once questioned my Central Valley upbringing when I called them all-monds.

Jack said...

These were even available at our Farmer's Market a year ago. Ah-monds.

Now, again, why do we need to have all of our Almonds pasteurized? Oh, for fear that a less-scrupulous producer/packager might do a Spinach thing, shutting everyone down.

mimi said...

Man, too easy! I was gonna say almonds too but everyone else beat me to it. My friend grew almonds in her back yard as a kid. When they are green like that you can break them open and there is a clear viscous liquid inside that smells like amaretto.

Sandi said...

Well, I didn't have a clue, so I'm glad others did.

Diane said...

green almonds...mmmmmmm....
thery have them at Berkeley Bowl from time to time.

Marc said...

Kat and Diane -- your answer is partly correct. They are indeed almonds. However, they are not "green almonds" because they are ready to be harvested, and thus the shells have hardened to a point that makes them inedible (but the nut inside is quite tasty!). Because I neglected to mention that the photos were taken last week (rows of trees on either side of that row had already been harvested, and the fruit was lying on the ground), your mistake is understandable. Green almonds are typically harvested in March (but not at this farm, which doesn't see much financial benefit in it).

Derrick -- the farmer who led the tour of the orchard (John Lagier) said "ah-mond" and gave the example of "salmon" when asked about his pronunciation. Gotta love the "rules" in the English language...

Jack -- the almond pasteurization rule is indeed preposterous. This is something that the "market" should be taking care of on its own. If the Almond Board is worried about their good name, why not create a "pasteurized almond" label that can be placed on the products of those who do the pasteurization. And then let growers sell truly raw almonds if they want to.

Mimi -- of course the quiz is easy if you have seen almonds on the tree before now. I can't recall a time when I have seen a photograph of almonds on the tree---not on TV cooking shows, in cookbooks, in food magazines, or in the newspaper.



I'll have a lot more about the life cycle of an almond in a little while.